70.089 (1754) The Phoenix Eulithis prunata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D
























 
History
Lennon (1860) stated he had bred 10 on, presumably from larvae he had collected from around Dumfries whilst out rambling. By 1863, Lennon stated it as very common. Buchanan White of Perth (1895) listed it as occurring in Colvend parish. Gordon (1919) had found it to be "seemingly scarce." He mentions just three records: - one beaten from oak at Corsemalzie late September, 1897, one found in his house at Corsemalzie 16th July 1905, with the last being found at Newton Stewart station on 30th July 1905.
 
Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn (VC72). F. W. Smith recorded it from Southwick (VC73) in July 1946.
 
With just over twenty records through the 1970s and 1980s, all but one from the Rothamsted surveys, it was found to be a scarce species.
 
Records increased through the 1990s and 21st century but most of these were from personal trapping at homes and coincided with increased observers.
 
Life Cycle
One generation. Overwinters as an egg attached to the foodplant.
 
Larval foodplants
Black Currant, Gooseberry and Red Currant.
 
Identification
Although resembling Small Phoenix it is quite larger and darker looking with the cross-band broadening at the costa.
 
Habitat
Gardens and woodland.
© Keith Naylor per A B Duncan, Closeburn, 7 July 1970

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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