70.060 (1737) Small Argent and Sable Epirrhoe tristata (Linnaeus, 1758) 

Status
Resident. Scarce.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D
























 
History
The earliest notification of this species is published in Stephens (1829) with the Rev. William Little recording it at Raehills (VC72) stating it to be very common.
 
Gordon (1919) had been informed by J. Garraway of one or two taken near Garheugh Cottage, Luce Bay, Wigtownshire in 1909.
 
Archibald Russell (1944) listed it as occurring near Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) during the years 1942-43. Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn, Tynron and Castlehill, Dumfries (all VC72).
 
It was not recorded from then until a couple of records were noted during the early 1960s, followed by a dozen during the 1970s, but then none during the 1980s.
 
With more observers, this day flying moth started to be recorded again during 1994-98, but then another lapse until recorded again during 2004-06, and again in 2009-2010.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a pupa in acocoon on the ground. Larvae are present July and August.
 
Larval foodplants
Heath Bedstraw.
 
Identification
The three cross-bands are all of the same strength dark greyish-brown colour, with chequered fringes on the wings. Also the white cross-bands have a series of fine dark dots running through them to give it a distinctive look.
 
Habitat
Moorland and other grassland where the larval foodplant of Heath Bedstraw is found.
© Keith Naylor, Bennan, Glen Trool, 28 June 2009

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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