70.171 (1844) Ochreous Pug Eupithecia indigata (Hübner, [1813])

Status
Resident. Rare.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D
























 
History
Lennon (1863) stated that it was very rare, but that it had occurred at Dalskairth (VC73). Gordon (1919) found it not uncommon flying at dusk and at rest on tree trunks and rocks around Corsemalzie, Wigtownshire.
 
Pelham-Clinton recorded it from Rockcliffe and Palnackie (VC73) during the mid-1960s.
 
In 1997 it was found again at Lochmaben and verified by K. P. Bland and the following year at Caerlaverock WWT (VC72). Wigtownshire has one other record from Sorbie in late May 2009.
 
Confirmed in Riley & Prior (2003) for VC73 but status unclear for VCs 72 and 74. However, one was caught at Eskrigg NR, Lockerbie (VC72) on 16th May 2012.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a pupa among needles of the foodplant in a cocoon. Larvae are present mid-June to mid-September.
 
Larval foodplants
Larvae feed mainly on Scot's Pine, but also known to feed on Lodgepole Pine and Larch.
 
Identification
Its small size with narrow, pointed sandy or greyish forewings, held angled backwards, with prominent black dash in the central portion and dark spots on the costa should help identify it against Thyme Pug. Care required to separate from other 'pugs.'
 
Habitat
Pine plantations and other areas where pine is abundant.
 
Recorders' notes
It is obviously being overlooked with so much larval foodplant abounding.
© Keith Naylor, Eskrigg NR, Lockerbie, 16 May 2012

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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