70.141 (1862) Double-striped Pug Gymnoscelis rufifasciata (Haworth, 1809)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D






















 
History
Lennon (1863) stated that it was not common, but that it had occurred at Dalskairth (VC73). Gordon (1919) took two flying at dusk near his house at Corsemalzie on 10th May 1898. Pelham-Clinton (1983) records it for VC72. Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn (VC72) and Kirkconnell Flow (VC73). Archibald Russell (1944) listed it as occurring near Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) during the years 1942-43.
 
During 1974-93 all seven Rothamsted stations recorded it over 100 times altogether, making it our most populous pug. From 1993 to 2010 it has proved to be still widespread being recorded from many widely scattered sites across the region.
 
It was also confirmed across the region in Riley & Prior (2003).
 
Life cycle
Two generations. Overwinters as a pupa. Larvae are present from early May to late October.
 
Larval foodplants
Flowers of a wide variety of plants, including Broom, Gorse, Heather, Holly, Ivy, Ragworts, Rowan, Sea Aster and Traveller's-joy.
 
Identification
Unmistakeable.
 
Habitat
Gardens, Heathland, Moorland and Woodland.
 
Recorders' notes
Care required to separate from other 'pugs,' if not known to you.
© Keith Naylor, Dalbeattie, 21 April 2011

Local distribution map

The gadget spec URL could not be found

Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
 Powered by the  NBN Gateway