70.277 (1955) Common White Wave Cabera pusaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D























 
History
Lennon (1863) under Cabera pusaria stated it as common everywhere around the Dumfries area. However, under Cabera rotundaria, which is a synonym of the Common White Wave, he stated it as very rare, but had found it at Lochaber in the Mabie Forest. K. J. Morton of Edinburgh (1900) whilst on a visit in July 1899 to Wigtownshire had found this species in the Monreith area. Gordon (1919) found it abundant and generally distributed in Wigtownshire. Earliest date was 1st June 1899.
 
Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn and Lochar (VC72) and Kirkconnell Flow (VC73). Archibald Russell (1944) listed it as occurring near Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) during the years 1942-43.
 
During 1974-93 there was a combined total of hundreds of records from the following Rothamsted stations: Gatehouse of Fleet, Bridge of Dee and Mabie Forest (VC73), Waterside Mains at Keir (VC72), with just two records from the Newton Stewart site. The Hensol Estate also proved popular during 1981-84.
 
From 1993 to 2010 it has been recorded from a large number of widespread sites, mainly in Dumfriesshire and Kirkcudbrightshire; Wigtownshire probably being under-recorded.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a pupa at ground level. Larvae during July to October in varying sizes.
 
Larval foodplants
Larvae feed on birches, willows and Alder.
 
Identification
A plain white moth with grey speckling and three straight lines on the forewing make it very distinctive.
 
Habitat
Woodland and scrub.
© Valerie Harrison, Glenstockadale, 30 June 2011

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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