3.002 (0017) Common Swift Korscheltellus lupulina (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status
Resident. Local.
 
Flight period
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History
Lennon (1863) stated it to be "common everywhere." Gordon (1913) found it to be "common in fields and on roadside near Corsemalzie where he caught one among long grass at dusk on 4th June 1911," this being the only record to date for VC74.
 
MOGBI displayed no records, but their data only went up to 1975. Since then there have been a host of records from the Rothamsted station at Waterside Mains at Keir, Dumfriesshire, from 1976 onwards. Kirkcudbrightshire can only muster a handful of records, all from the 21st century.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a larva during July to April, with pupation taking place underground.
 
Larval foodplants
Larvae feed on the roots of grasses and other herbaceous plants.
 
Identification
Care needed in separating from other 'swifts.'
 
Habitat
Grassland and other open habitats.
 
Recorders' notes
The Common Swift has no proboscis, so it is never found at sugar or flowers. Sexes are easy to tell apart, but very few records sexed.
© Brian Henderson, Courance, 31 May 2012

Local distribution map

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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