70.234 (1913) Canary-shouldered Thorn Ennomos alniaria (Authority, Year)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D
























 
History
Lennon (1863) stated that it was not common, but that it had occurred at Lochaber in the Mabie Forest (VC73). Gordon (1919) stated it was common at light at Corsemalzie, Wigtownshire, having taken a fine series from the 18th to 26th September 1910.Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn, Tynron and Castlehill, Dumfries (all VC72).
 
During 1974-92 there were many records, particular at Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) and Waterside Mains (VC73), at all seven Rothamsted stations, proving it to be our second commonest 'thorn.' During 1993-2010 it has been found to be widespread being recorded from about fifty sites.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as an egg on the foodplant. Larvae during May to July. Pupation taking place among plant debris.
 
Larval foodplants
Larvae feed on various trees including Alder, birches, limes and elms.
 
Identification
Unmistakeable.
 
Habitat
Wooded areas including parks and gardens.
 
Recorders' notes
As with all 'thorns' it rests with its wings in the upright or butterfly position, with the canary yellow abdomen making it a most attractive moth.
© Keith Naylor, Dalbeattie, 6 August 2006

Local distribution map

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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