70.156 (1852) Brindled Pug Eupithecia abbreviata Stephens, 1831

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
J F M A M J J A S O N D
























 
History
Lennon (1863) had found it near The Craigs (VC72). Gordon (1919) found it common flying at dusk around sallows on the moors near Corsemalzie (VC74), with nine on 7th and again on 10th May 1911. It also came to light. Earliest date was 21st April 1912.
 
Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn, Tynron and Castlehill, Dumfries (all VC72). Archibald Russell (1944) listed it as occurring near Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) during the years 1942-43.
 
It was 1975 before it was recorded again, with records from Waterside Mains at Keir (VC72), Gatehouse of Fleet and Mabie Forest up to and including 1992 at the Rothamsted stations there. Kirkcudbrightshire is still the stonghold for this species during 1992-2010, with just one record for Wigtownshire from Glenwhan Gardens, but a few more from the traps run at Durisdeer (VC72) during the same period.
 
It was accepted for VC72 in Riley & Prior (2003) but the status was unclear for VCs 73 and 74.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a pupa. Larvae are present during June and July.
 
Larval foodplants
Pedunculate Oak, Sessile Oak and Hawthorn.
 
Identification
The pale patch with the prominent dash inside and the wedge-shaped projections pointing inwards as well help to identify it.
 
Habitat
Oak woodland, but also hedgerows and gardens in well-wooded areas.
 
Recorders' notes
Care needed in separating from other 'pugs.'
© Alison Robertson, Langyards Wood, 2 April 2011

Local distribution map

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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