70.226 (1906) Brimstone Moth Opisthograptis luteolata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
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History
K. J. Morton of Edinburgh (1900) whilst on a visit in July 1899 to Wigtownshire had found this species in the Monreith area. Gordon (1919) found it very common and generally distributed in Wigtownshire, stating it flies along hedge sides and near woods. Earliest date was 10th May 1898.
 
Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn, Tynron and Castlehill, Dumfries (all VC72). Archibald Russell (1944) listed it as occurring near Gatehouse of Fleet (VC73) during the years 1942-43.
 
Many specimens were caught in the seven Rothamsted stations across the region showing what a common species it is. Wherever portable moth trapping has occurred the Brimstone Moth brightens up the catch, being one of the most commonest Geometrids.
 
Life cycle
The extended flight period probably includes two or three generations of the year. They overwinter as part-grown larvae or as pupae in cocoons on the foodplant. The first adults that occur during May and June result from the overwintering pupae, while the later generations, that are smaller, are from the larvae that have overwintered that resume feeding in the spring.
 
Larval foodplants
Larvae feed mainly on Blackthorn and Hawthorn.
 
Identification
Unmistakeable.
 
Habitat
Scrub, hedgerows and gardens.
© Valerie Harrison, Glenstockadale, 13 July 2011

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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