70.284 (1962) Barred Red Hylaea fasciaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

Status
Resident. Common.
 
Flight period
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History
Lennon (1860) stated he had found this species around Dumfries whilst out walking that season. By 1863, he had found it at Tinwald Downs but stated it was not common.
 
Gordon (1919) found it to be local, being scarce at Corsemalzie, whereas W. S. Brocklehurst informed Gordon that he had taken it commonly at light in July, 1910, at Craigenveoch, Glenluce, Wigtownshire. William Evans received a specimen from D. A. Mowat, keeper at Killantringan lighthouse at the end of July, 1913, for his research into moth migration at Scottish lighthouses.
 
Sir Arthur Duncan (1909-84) during his lifetime had found it at Closeburn, Tynron and Castlehill, Dumfries (all VC72).
 
Next records were from the Rothamsted stations during 1975-93, with Caerlaverock being the only one to miss out. With the aid of portable trapping the Barred Red has proved to be widespread across the region during the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century.
 
Life cycle
One generation. Overwinters as a small larva on its foodplant, during September to late May. Pupation takes place on the ground among conifer needles and plant debris.
 
Larval Foodplants
Larvae feed mainly on Scot's Pine and Norway Spruce, but also Larch and Western Hemlock.
 
Identification
Very distinctive.
 
Habitat
This species is especially common in conifer plantations, but is found wherever the foodplants occur.
© Peter Norman, Kirkcudbright, July 2005

Local distribution map

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Distribution map displays records from the National Biodiversity Network (See terms and conditions).

The following datasets are included:

  • Butterfly Conservation - Macro-moth provisional distribution for the British Isles (excluding the Republic of Ireland) from the National Moth Recording Scheme
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